[DM]

Avalanche Bulletin - Glacier National Park

Issued Sat May 03, 2014 08:23
Valid Until further notice
This is the final daily avalanche bulletin for the season. We will update if there are significant changes. Contact the Visitor Safety staff at Rogers Pass for help with safe trip planning in the spring and summer seasons.

        

Danger Ratings: Saturday

alpine treeline below treeline alpine: N/A - No Rating, treeline: N/A - No Rating, below treeline: N/A - No Rating
alpine: N/A - No Rating
N/A - No Rating N/A
N/A
treeline: N/A - No Rating
N/A - No Rating N/A
N/A
below treeline: N/A - No Rating
N/A - No Rating N/A
N/A
Forecast Sunday Monday
alpine
N/A - No Rating N/A - No Rating
treeline N/A - No Rating N/A - No Rating
below treeline N/A - No Rating N/A - No Rating

Weather Observations

Past 24 Hr WeatherFidelity 1905mRogers Pass 1315m
Maximum (°C)95
Minimum (°C)-3-1
Snowfall (cm)20
Snow Pack (cm)325125
Wind speedStrong (41-60 km/h)Strong (41-60 km/h)
Ridgetop wind directionNWE
Past 24 Hr WeatherFidelity 1905mRogers Pass 1315m
Maximum (°C)95
Minimum (°C)-3-1
Snowfall (cm)20
Snow Pack (cm)325125
Wind speedStrong (41-60 km/h)Strong (41-60 km/h)
Ridgetop wind directionNWE
Low Moderate Considerable High Extreme
  • Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
  • Natural and human-triggered avalanches unlikely.
  • Small avalanches in isolated areas or extreme terrain.
  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
  • Natural avalanches unlikely; human-triggered avalanches possible.
  • Small avalanches in specific areas; or large avalanches in isolated areas.
  • Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making essential.
  • Natural avalanches possible; human-triggered avalanches likely.
  • Small avalanches in many areas; or large avalanches in specific areas; or very large avalanches in isolated areas.
  • Very dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended.
  • Natural avalanches likely; human-triggered avalanches very likely.
  • Large avalanches in many areas; or very large avalanches in specific areas.
  • Avoid all avalanche terrain.
  • Natural and human-triggered avalanches certain.
  • Large to very large avalanches in many areas.

Problem 1: Loose Wet

Which Elevation?

Which Elevation? treeline, below treeline, alpine

Which Slopes?

Which Slopes? southwest, south, southeast, west, northwest, east, north, northeast

Chance of Avalanches?

Chance of Avalanches? possible

Expected Size?

Expected Size? small - large
Watch for periods of warming in the form of sun or rain to weaken the snowpack. As the snowpack continues to warm and lose strength, large avalanche events will occur.

Travel and Terrain Advice

  • Avoid avalanche terrain during periods of strong sun or heavy rain.
  • Start and finish early before the surface crusts melt.

Problem 2: Deep Persistent Slabs

Which Elevation?

Which Elevation? alpine, treeline

Which Slopes?

Which Slopes? southeast, southwest, south, west, east, northwest, north, northeast

Chance of Avalanches?

Chance of Avalanches? unlikely - possible

Expected Size?

Expected Size? large - very large
Very large and deep avalanches occurred on May 2. They were triggered naturally by rain following several days without an overnight freeze and by avalanche control. Large avalanches are possible as the snowpack continues to warm and lose strength.

Travel and Terrain Advice

  • Avoid slopes when the solar radiation is strong, especially if they have large cornices overhead.
  • Be aware of the potential for full depth avalanches due to deeply buried weak layers.

Problem 3: Storm Slabs

Which Elevation?

Which Elevation? alpine

Which Slopes?

Which Slopes? north, northeast, east, southeast, southwest, south, west, northwest

Chance of Avalanches?

Chance of Avalanches? possible

Expected Size?

Expected Size? small - large
As spring storms continue to bring new snow at higher elevations, watch for storm or wind slabs to develop on surface crusts in the alpine or tree-line.